25 may 2017

Central Asia news

Tajikistan: Sergeant of the 201st Russian Military Base robbed a bank

03.10.2007 16:36 msk

Staff correspondent

Tajikistan

Ferghana.Ru sources in Tajikistan report that serviceman of the 149th Motorized Infantry Regiment of the 201st Russian Military Base quartered in Kulyab heisted a local bank at approximately 3 a.m. on September 23. The serviceman got in through one of the windows of the first floor and got out again with a word processor. Alarm system remained stubbornly silent all through this escapade (bank employees had failed to latch the window properly and that interfered with the alarm system). The processor stashed safely away somewhere nearby, the man returned to the bank, got in, and took a stroll along the ground floor corridor apparently looking for something else to loot. The alarm system went on, however, and the night guard descended on the freebooter who wrestled free and escaped. The night guard was only left with a piece of battle fatigues on his hands and, surprisingly, documents in the name of Private Dmitry Bugreyev apparently dropped by the intruder in his haste to escape.

Naturally enough, Kulyab police decided that Bugreyev was the looter. Their suspicions were only confirmed when the Russian military command proved absolutely uncooperative and refused to let the police have the suspect or even permit them on the territory of the garrison. Ferghana.Ru phoned press service of the Russian military base. Whoever answered the phone said that Bugreyev had an alibi and that Russian servicemen could not be involved.

According to Kulyab Prosecutor Nasrullo Mahmudov, the city administration had to apply pressure and pull strings in Dushanbe. It was eventually agreed that detectives would be permitted entry and a meeting with the suspect but only on the territory of the military base.

The actual looter was later identified as Sergeant of the Guards Alexander Ustinov. He had deliberately "dropped" Bugreyev's ID to mislead the investigation.

The night guard recognized Ustinov and the serviceman confessed. Tajik detectives had everything documented but there things rested for the time being. Referring to the acting Constitution of the Russian Federation, Unit 11507 command flatly refused to turn the serviceman over to Tajik law enforcement agencies.

The Tajik authorities were reassured that the guilty party would be prosecuted. These reassurances were taken with a certain grain of salt because bend-rulers and trespassers from this particular Russian garrison usually get off the hook.